Cortus Energy (STO:CE) Has Rewarded Shareholders With An Exceptional 438% Total Return On Their Investment

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Stock pickers are generally looking for stocks that will outperform the broader market. And the truth is, you can make significant gains if you buy good quality businesses at the right price. To wit, the Cortus Energy share price has climbed 74% in five years, easily topping the market decline of 5.6% (ignoring dividends). However, more recent returns haven’t been as impressive as that, with the stock returning just 51% in the last year.

Check out our latest analysis for Cortus Energy

With just kr409,000 worth of revenue in twelve months, we don’t think the market considers Cortus Energy to have proven its business plan. As a result, we think it’s unlikely shareholders are paying much attention to current revenue, but rather speculating on growth in the years to come. It seems likely some shareholders believe that Cortus Energy will discover or develop fossil fuel before too long.

Companies that lack both meaningful revenue and profits are usually considered high risk. There is usually a significant chance that they will need more money for business development, putting them at the mercy of capital markets to raise equity. So the share price itself impacts the value of the shares (as it determines the cost of capital). While some such companies go on to make revenue, profits, and generate value, others get hyped up by hopeful naifs before eventually going bankrupt. Some Cortus Energy investors have already had a taste of the sweet taste stocks like this can leave in the mouth, as they gain popularity and attract speculative capital.

Our data indicates that Cortus Energy had kr30m more in total liabilities than it had cash, when it last reported in December 2019. That makes it extremely high risk, in our view. So the fact that the stock is up 112% per year, over 5 years shows that high risks can lead to high rewards, sometimes. It’s clear more than a few people believe in the potential. You can see in the image below, how Cortus Energy’s cash levels have changed over time (click to see the values).

OM:CE Historical Debt April 26th 2020

It can be extremely risky to invest in a company that doesn’t even have revenue. There’s no way to know its value easily. Given that situation, many of the best investors like to check if insiders have been buying shares. It’s often positive if so, assuming the buying is sustained and meaningful. Luckily we are in a position to provide you with this free chart of insider buying (and selling).

What about the Total Shareholder Return (TSR)?

We’d be remiss not to mention the difference between Cortus Energy’s total shareholder return (TSR) and its share price return. The TSR is a return calculation that accounts for the value of cash dividends (assuming that any dividend received was reinvested) and the calculated value of any discounted capital raisings and spin-offs. We note that Cortus Energy’s TSR, at 438% is higher than its share price return of 74%. When you consider it hasn’t been paying a dividend, this data suggests shareholders have benefitted from a spin-off, or had the opportunity to acquire attractively priced shares in a discounted capital raising.

A Different Perspective

We’re pleased to report that Cortus Energy shareholders have received a total shareholder return of 51% over one year. That gain is better than the annual TSR over five years, which is 40%. Therefore it seems like sentiment around the company has been positive lately. Given the share price momentum remains strong, it might be worth taking a closer look at the stock, lest you miss an opportunity. I find it very interesting to look at share price over the long term as a proxy for business performance. But to truly gain insight, we need to consider other information, too. To that end, you should learn about the 7 warning signs we’ve spotted with Cortus Energy (including 4 which is are significant) .

But note: Cortus Energy may not be the best stock to buy. So take a peek at this free list of interesting companies with past earnings growth (and further growth forecast).

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on SE exchanges.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at [email protected] This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Thank you for reading.

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